Hellboy and the B.P.R.D. 1953: Beyond the Fences

HellboyBPRD1953_BeyondFence

For me, one of the problems with reading serialized arcs is that I don’t remember the nuances of previous installments. So for this arc, I decided to wait, collect the three issues, and then read them in one sitting. That worked really well for me.

In this tale, Hellboy and two other B.P.R.D. agents go to a small town in California to investigate the disappearance of several children and the mutilation of an adult. The encounter the monster responsible, which is actually a dog that mutated after eating some mysterious material that was the byproduct of a nuclear test. There is also Cold War conspiracy and intrigue woven in to the tale, which works nicely.

What I found most interesting about this series was the use of the fence as a symbol. The fence serves as a metaphor for what divides the two realms of reality, existence, consciousness, and so forth. On one side of the fence is the archetypical 1950’s community, but on the other side, chaos and the psychological uncertainty in the post World War II nuclear age. Also, there is the division between ordinary reality and alternate dimensions. The fence symbolically separates what we perceive in our normal state of consciousness and what lies beyond the veil in the subconscious regions of our psyches, Moving beyond the fence and exploring these areas of the subconscious can be terrifying and dangerous.

The writers and artists who collaborate on this do an amazing job of drawing on occult philosophies, symbolism, and thought. But it’s not just heady mysticism—the story is very good and engaging. It is well-written with excellent dialog, and the artwork is top-notch. I highly recommend reading these three issues if you have time. I suspect you will enjoy them as much as I did.

Cheers, and keep reading cool stuff.

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2 Comments

Filed under Literature

2 responses to “Hellboy and the B.P.R.D. 1953: Beyond the Fences

  1. The more reviews I read of yours from this genre, the more I am amazed at the complicated plots, characters and the use of symbolism, and the artwork and dialogue too! These are hardly comic books and it’s clear a lot of effort goes into them!

    • It’s so true. Essentially, you have to look at the genre (which I prefer to call graphic storytelling or graphic novel) as incorporating images as a way to drive the narrative. Possibly the best introduction to the genre is Art Spiegleman’s “Maus,” a graphic novel about Nazi Germany. Amazing! It won a Pulitzer Prize. I’m actually considering rereading that one.

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