Thoughts on the Bhagavad Gita (translated by Stephen Mitchell)

I’ve been wanting to read the Bhagavad Gita for a while, but the copy that I had (provided to me by the Hare Krishnas at a Dead concert) seemed very long, so I was reluctant to start. But recently I did give it a shot and quickly realized that it was about 90% commentary, so I put it back and made the decision to find a different translation. So when I was perusing books at a bookstore recently, I discovered a translation by the poet Stephen Mitchell. I figured this would be a good version for me to delve into, and I was correct. The text flowed beautifully, and it was very easy to follow and digest the text.

As with all spiritual texts, there is such a wealth of wisdom that it is impossible to do it justice in a short blog post. With that in mind, I will share a few quotes that I connected with, as well as my thoughts regarding those passages.

Driven by desire for pleasure
and power, caught up in ritual,
they strive to gain heaven; but rebirth
is the only result of their striving.

They are lured by their desires,
besotted by the scriptures’ words;
their minds have not been made clear
by the practice of meditation.

The scriptures dwell in duality.
Be beyond all opposites, Arjuna:
anchored in the real, and free
from all thoughts of wealth and comfort.

(p. 54)

While mystical and spiritual texts are great sources of wisdom and inspiration, Lord Krishna points out the issue—they fall short of the wisdom and freedom gained from active spiritual pursuits. Scripture uses symbolic language to try to express the ineffable experience of direct connection with the Divine which is gained through yoga and meditation. Those who seek the Divine solely in text will never find what they seek. It is only through actively engaging in practices that one may catch a momentary glimpse of the Divine.

As fire is obscured by smoke,
as a mirror is covered by dust,
as a fetus is wrapped in a membrane,
so wisdom is obscured by desire.

Wisdom is destroyed, Arjuna,
by the constant enemy of the wise,
which, flaring up as desire,
blazes with insatiable flames.

(p. 69)

This made me think a lot about our current society. Social media, advertising, and even the news to some extent, all feed the human desire for what they don’t have, or what they don’t have enough of, or what will keep them safe, and on and on and on. This desire, this constant striving, is manifesting much of our current social and political problems right now. People are prone to react rather than think and respond carefully. I have made a conscious effort to minimize the amount of social media and advertising information that I am exposed to, and as a result, I have become much happier and calmer.

I am the father of the universe
and its mother, essence and goal
of all knowledge, the refiner, the sacred
Om, and the threefold Vedas.

I am the beginning and the end,
origin and dissolution,
refuge, home, true lover,
womb and imperishable seed.

I am the heat of the sun,
I hold back the rain and release it,
I am death, and the deathless,
and all that is or is not.

(pp. 116 – 117)

What I like about this passage where Lord Krishna is describing himself to Arjuna is that he uses a series of opposites to describe his essence. It is like a balancing of light and dark, yin and yang, life and death. The Divine must surly encompass all, for everything emanates from the Source and, therefore, everything must exist within the Source. This kind of echoes Revelation 22:13 where Christ says: “I am the Alpha and the Omega, the first and the last, the beginning and the end.”

This is the soul-destroying
threefold entrance to hell:
desire, anger, and greed.
Every man should avoid them.

The man who refuses to enter
these three gates into darkness
does what is best for himself
and attains the ultimate goal.

(p. 173)

This is so true. If more people would replace desire with acceptance, anger with love and forgiveness, and greed with charity, what a different world this would be. How much happier we would be as a global society. There is still hope for us. Although I sometimes despair, I remember that humans have an incredible capacity to change. I will do my best to help promote change for the better.

Thanks for stopping by, and many blessings!

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6 Comments

Filed under Literature, Spiritual

6 responses to “Thoughts on the Bhagavad Gita (translated by Stephen Mitchell)

  1. I loved this, the quotes you chose and your comments. Letting go of desire, desire for particular outcomes, for things to be the way I want them is one I struggle with. But when I manage to do so, to whatever degree, I always feel such amazing peace. Thank you for this.

    • Hi Deborah. I’m so glad you enjoyed the post! One of the central themes of this text is that you should focus on your actions without attachment to the outcomes. But that is so counter-intuitive in our results-driven society. But you’re right, when you can have a moment of detachment from results and desires, you feel so much better.

      Thanks for taking the time to read my post and for sharing your thoughts. Have a great day!

      Jeff

  2. I like the translation you chose. A poet who understands the ideas!

  3. I’m reading this at just the right time, Jeff. I do hope that we all still have the capacity to change. I remember reading this for a Philosophy and Religion class in college. I can’t imagine that I understood what I was reading, though. Do you think you had the capacity to understand philosophy as a teenager? Great post!

    • Hi Barb. Great comment! Regarding the capacity to understand philosophy as a teenager, I think yes, to an extent. Philosophical and spiritual texts have layers of meaning, kind of like poetry. As you develop and gain more life experience, they take on different meanings. But reading them while young sows the seeds of knowledge that grow and help form your ideas. Don’t ever doubt that the things you read in your youth affected the path of your life. I know that this is the case for me. Imagine if all the leaders in DC had read the Gita as teenagers? I suspect there would be less political dysfunction 😀

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