Tag Archives: pirates

Poem #11: “I never told the buried gold” by Emily Dickinson

EmilyDickinson

I never told the buried gold
Upon the hill — that lies —
I saw the sun — his plunder done
Crouch low to guard his prize.

He stood as near
As stood you here —
A pace had been between —
Did but a snake bisect the brake
My life had forfeit been.

That was a wondrous booty —
I hope ’twas honest gained.
Those were the fairest ingots
That ever kissed the spade!

Whether to keep the secret —
Whether to reveal —
Whether as I ponder
Kidd will sudden sail —

Could a shrewd advise me
We might e’en divide —
Should a shrewd betray me —
Atropos decide!

I struggled with this poem. I read it a few times and was still not completely certain what Emily was trying to convey. So I focused on the image of the gold, or the treasure, and tried to figure out what it could symbolize. The only thing I could come up with was that it was a metaphor for religious teaching, particularly the words of Christ from the Sermon on the Mount. And the more I considered the poem from this perspective, the more it made sense. Christ’s teachings were presented in parables, with the truth hidden below the surface. And when you consider that the gold was buried upon a hill, then the idea of the treasure being the hidden meaning of Christ’s Sermon on the Mount makes sense.

Then I thought about the pirate, or Captain Kidd. It seemed likely that the pirate represents priests, who took possession of Christ’s teachings and wanted to be the keepers of the treasure, to be the sole guardians of the truth. But Emily had seen the treasure, and knew the truth herself. So now she is in a quandary—should she keep the secret or spread the truth? It seems that she found a compromise; keep the treasure hidden within her poetry but available to those with the wisdom to understand.

It seems at the end, Emily wonders whether her choice was the right one. She decides to let Atropos decide. Atropos is one of the Fates, so she is leaving it to fate to judge whether she was right or wrong. In my opinion, she was right.

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Looney Tunes: Issue #161

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Last weekend I attended the Asheville Comic Expo with my daughter. While I was there I met Matthew Manning, who is a contributing writer for this issue. I spoke with him for a while and I picked up this issue, which he graciously signed for me.

Although I loved watching Looney Tunes and Bugs Bunny as a kid, I can’t recall ever reading a Bugs Bunny comic. While it was not quite as enjoyable as the cartoon (there is something about Mel Blanc’s voice that just makes you want to laugh), I still enjoyed reading it. It brought back a lot of memories.

The comic is comprised of three short comic vignettes, all of which feature Bugs himself. The stories include some of the other classic Looney Tunes characters: Yosemite Sam (as the pirate High Seas Sam), Elmer Fudd, the Crusher, and a cameo by Daffy Duck. Sitting and reading about their antics on a Saturday morning brought back the feeling of watching Saturday morning cartoons. It is a good feeling.

I have to say, I weawy wiked weading about dat wascawy wabbit. I think I will have to watch some old episodes on YouTube next.

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Kill Shakespeare: The Mask of Night – Issue #1

KillShakespeareMoN_01

I was very excited when I found out that a new Kill Shakespeare series was being published. I read the first series and loved it. Unfortunately, when I went to the local comic store to buy a copy of the first issue, it was already sold out. I placed an order and thankfully was able to get a copy last week.

The blurb on the cover states: “This comic features sex, pirates, swordfights, poetry, AND people puking. It’s basically classic Shakespeare?” And yes, this comic has all that.

The story begins with Hamlet, Juliet, Othello, and Shakespeare aboard a vessel that is attacked by the pirate Cesario, who is accompanied by his first mate and lover, Viola. The four had escaped the destruction of Prospero’s island, but are plagued with daggers of the mind and seem to lapse into moments of anger and delusion. Still, Cesario recognizes the value of these captives, especially Juliet. His ultimate plan is not made known, but the stage is set for what is to unfold in the upcoming issues.

I have issue #2 already, but I have a lot of other stuff to read, so I suspect it will be a little while before I get to it. But rest assured, I will peruse these glossy pages and share with thee my thoughts.

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